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Health and Safety Videos

FACE Reports - a product of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health - are an often overlooked treasure. Every NIOSH Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) report provides exacting details of the conditions and series of events that led to a deadly incident and concludes with "recommendations for preventing similar deaths."  

That's why CPWR used information collected by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to create three short training videos, each based on the true story of a fatal construction incident. These two or three minute videos begin by describing the work being performed, the background of the crew and the worksite conditions, and then let the decisions made unfold to show, sadly, why "this death could have been prevented." 

 A Simple Task - Fatal Ladder Fall 

This 2-min. video using photos and animation recreates the real-life series of events that led to the death of a 33-year-old construction worker from a ladder fall -- and how it could have been prevented. 

Download Video (85 MB)
View on YouTube

 

  Look Up and Live

This 3-min. video using photos and animation recreates the real-life series of events that led to the electrocution death of a 23-year-old construction worker from an overhead power line -- and how the death could have been prevented.

Download Video (131 MB)
View on YouTube

 

  No New Year

This 3-min. video using photos and animation recreates the real-life series of events that led to the death of a 32-year-old construction worker from a trench collapse – and how the death could have been prevented. 

Download Video (157 MB)
View on YouTube


 

CPWR also offers videos covering ergonomics, protection from fumes and dusts, disaster response and how workers have suggested ways to improve safety.

These videos can be viewed instantly online, or a DVD can be requested by contacting Sharretta Benjamin, 301-578-8500.

Don’t Fall For It. 2006. 13 minutes. English and Spanish version on one DVD, available for $10, or download below.  For an injury prevention campaign, mixes interviews with survivors of falls from ladders (or victims’ survivors) with information about safe procedures (also on DVD). Accompanying worker tip sheets also available in English and Spanish.

   English version, 81 MB (High-resolution file to view or right click + select 'Save Image As' to download video file)

   Spanish version, 81 MB  (High-resolution file to view or right click + select 'Save Image As' to download video file)

   English version, 27 MB  (High-resolution file to view or right click + select 'Save Image As' to download video file)

   Spanish version, 27 MB  (High-resolution file to view or right click + select 'Save Image As' to download video file)

   Tip Sheet #1 - Protect Yourself from Fatal or Crippling Falls
   English 
   Spanish

   Tip Sheet #2 - Choosing and Inspecting Ladders
   English 
   Spanish

   Tip Sheet #3 - Setting Up Portable Ladders
   English
   Spanish

   Tip Sheet #4 - Climbing Ladders Safely
   English
   Spanish

   Don't Fall For It! Preview Survey
   English
   Spanish

   Don't Fall For It! Post VIew Survey 
   English
   Spanish

 

Drywall Dust Engineering Controls. 1998. 7 minutes. Shows the use of engineering (local-exhaust) controls to reduce dusts produced during drywall work using real-time monitoring. Drywall mud may contain silica, which can cause two fatal diseases, lung cancer and silicosis. 

Ergonomics in Construction. 1996. 18 minutes. Shows ergonomics researchers trying to match jobs to workers to help reduce injuries, illnesses, and sprains and strains in construction; also demonstrates some tools and techniques to improve safety and health. This video was originally produced by the German Berufsgenossenschaften der Bauwirtschaft (Industrial Accident Injuries Insurance and Labour Accident Prevention Corporation under Public Law for the Construction Industry). 

Preventing Musculoskeletal Injuries. 1994. 5 minutes. Reviews some of the job factors that can result in musculoskeletal disorders from construction work and what can be done about them.

Real-Time Monitoring Program. 1993. 5 minutes. Shows one approach to assessing exposures to chemical hazards on construction sites. Industrial hygienists measured exposures to asphalt and welding fumes as they occurred on a new construction site using a camera that records changing exposure levels on a gauge on screen.

Welding: A Control Technology. 2000. 8 minutes. Uses real-time monitoring – a changing bar graph on screen – to show how local-exhaust ventilation can reduce worker exposures to toxic fumes during welding. 

Workers Are the Experts. 2000. 6 minutes. Shows how construction workers' ideas can improve safety and health on site. Features a safe bridge construction project, a vacuum system to reduce silica exposures to masonry workers, a crane mirror system, and ergonomic improvements on Boston's Big Dig.