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A Pilot Study of Nanoparticle Levels and Field Evaluation of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators on Construction Sites

Submicron ultrafine particles and nanoparticles found in construction dust can be inhaled deeply into the lungs and retained in the lower airways. However, we lack field test data establishing nanoparticle exposure levels on construction sites, and the filtration efficiency of N95 respirators commonly worn by construction workers on the job. Researchers positioned a manikin wearing an N95 respirator on multiple construction sites and used a commercially available nanoparticle counter to measure exposures and respirator efficiency by collecting samples from inside and outside the mask.

Mistakeproofing the Design of Construction Processes Using Inventive Problem Solving

“Mistakeproofing” is the use of any device or method that either makes it impossible for an error to occur or makes the error immediately obvious once it has occurred. The objective of mistakeproofing is to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of errors, as they cause resource waste and defects. Mistakeproofing includes both labor and management: everyone can help identify opportunities to reduce or eliminate errors by applying mistakeproofing tools and practices through creative problem-solving.

Reducing Highway Construction Fatalities Through Improved Adoption of Safety Technologies

Highway construction is commonly associated with high rates of worker accidents. Nevertheless, the diffusion of safety technologies such as work zone intrusion alert technology (WZIAT) within the highway construction industry is limited due to concerns about technology effectiveness, cost implications of adopting a technology, and failure to perceive potential safety and cost benefits. This study attempts to develop tools and identify effective processes that could be used to improve the adoption of work zone safety technologies using work zone intrusion technology as a case study.

Aluminet: An Intervention for Heat-related Illness among Construction Workers

Heat illness is a major occupational hazard for construction workers, who often spend the summer months working outdoors or in hot, enclosed spaces. Manufacturers are producing a growing array of protective garments and products geared to the construction workforce to mitigate heat stress. In this study, researchers tested a new aluminum-fiber (“Aluminet”) vest designed to reflect heat.

Safety Management in the Construction Industry 2017

Once again, CPWR teamed up with Dodge Data & Analytics to survey American construction contractors about key trends and innovations in construction safety and health. Safety Management in the Construction Industry 2017 is the third in a series of studies that demonstrate the financial and project benefits that contractors gain from their safety investments. It also shows the impact that new technologies, such as building information modeling (BIM), drones, and wearable devices, have on improving safety.

Occupational Safety and Health in Green Buildings: LEED PtD Pilot Credit Analysis

Prevention through Design (PtD) incorporates elements into building design that will reduce safety and health risks for the workers who will construct and maintain the building. In 2015, the US Green Building Council launched a PtD pilot credit as part of the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification program. The research team examined early implementation of the pilot credit. Using case studies of two European construction projects that pursued the credit, and surveys and interviews with domestic building industry stakeholders, they explored why U.S.

Applying Prevention through Design (PtD) to Solar Systems in Small Buildings

Solar technology has grown cheaper and more economically attractive in recent years, and a growing number of homeowners are having rooftop solar panels installed. Employees of the small to mid-sized contractors performing this work face unique safety hazards. The research team interviewed workers, contractors and engineers in the industry to identify choices during the design process that can reduce worker exposure to injury during construction.

Improving Work Zone Safety Utilizing a New Mobile Proximity Sensing Technology

Struck-by injuries are one of construction’s “fatal four” leading causes of death on the job; collisions between heavy equipment and workers on a busy jobsite are all too frequent. To reduce this risk, researchers designed and tested a proximity sensing and alert system using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology. The system monitors the location and direction of moving equipment and alerts both equipment operators and workers on the ground to collision hazards.

Improving Work Zone Safety Utilizing a New Mobile Proximity Sensing Technology

Struck-by injuries are one of construction’s “fatal four” leading causes of death on the job; collisions between heavy equipment and workers on a busy jobsite are all too frequent. To reduce this risk, researchers designed and tested a proximity sensing and alert system using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology. The system monitors the location and direction of moving equipment and alerts both equipment operators and workers on the ground to collision hazards.

Owners' Role in Facilitating Designing for Construction Safety

Prevention through Design (PtD) incorporates construction worker safety in the design of a building project. Researchers surveyed 103 construction owners, and interviewed 65, to assess their awareness of PtD, and to learn how owners applied PtD elements in their projects.

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